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Wind power in power systems / edited by Thomas Ackermann.

Contributor(s): Ackermann, Thomas [editor.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Edition: Second edition.Description: 1 online resource (1758 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781119941842; 1119941849; 9781119942085; 111994208X; 0470974168; 9780470974162; 9781119941835; 1119941830.Subject(s): Wind power plants | Wind power | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING -- Power Resources -- General | Electrical engineering | Engineering | Wind power | Wind power plantsGenre/Form: Electronic books. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Wind Power in Power Systems.DDC classification: 621.31/2136 | 621.312136 Online resources: Wiley Online Library
Contents:
Cover; Notation; Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Contributors; Abbreviations; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Preface: Wind Power Myths Debunked; 2.1 Can Grid Operators Deal with the Variability of Wind Power?; 2.2 Does Wind Power Require Back-up Generation?; 2.3 Aren't More CO2 Emissions Generated with Wind Power in Power Systems than Without, Due to Back-up Requirements?; 2.4 Does Wind Power Require Storage?2; 2.5 Isn't the Existing Flexibility Already Fully Utilized?; 2.6 How Often Does the Wind Stop Blowing Everywhere at the Same Time?
2.7 To What Extent can Wind Power Production be Predicted? 2.8 Is it Expensive to Integrate Wind?; 2.9 Doesn't Wind Power Production Require New Transmission, and won't that Make Wind Expensive?10; 2.10 Does Wind Power have Capacity Credit?; 2.11 Don't Wind Power Plants have Low Capacity Factors?; 2.12 Is Wind Power Generation Cost-competitive with Coal or Nuclear?; 2.13 Is there a Limit to How Much Wind Generation Capacity can be Accommodated by the Grid?; 2.14 Summary; Acknowledgment; References; Part A : Theoretical Background.
Chapter 3: Historical Development and Current Status of Wind Power 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Historical Background; 3.3 Current Status of Wind Power Worldwide; 3.4 Status of Wind Turbine Technology; 3.5 Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 4: Wind Power in Power Systems: An Introduction; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Power System History; 4.3 Current Status of Wind Power in Power Systems; 4.4 Network Integration Issues for Wind Power; 4.5 Basic Electrical Engineering; 4.6 Characteristics of Wind Power Generation; 4.7 Basic Integration Issues Related to Wind Power; 4.8 Conclusions.
Appendix mechanical Equivalent to Power System Operation with WindPower AA. 1 Introduction; A.2 Active Power Balance; A.3 Synchronous Machines; A.4 Asynchronous Machines; A.5 Power Electronic Interfaces; A.6 Frequency Control; A.7 Wind Power; A.8 Reactive Power Balance; A.9 Asynchronous Machines; A.10 Capacitors; A.11 Synchronous Machines; A.12 Power Electronic Interfaces; References; Chapter 5: Generators and Power Electronics for Wind Turbines; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 State-of-the-Art Technologies; 5.3 Generator Concepts; 5.4 Power Electronic Concepts.
5.5 Power Electronic Solutions in WindFarms 5.6 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6: Power System Impacts of Wind Power; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Operation of the Power System; 6.3 Wind Power Production and the Power System; 6.4 Effects of Wind Energy on the Power System; 6.5 Conclusions; References; Chapter 7: The Value of Wind Power; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 The Value of a Power Plant; 7.3 The Value of Wind Power; 7.4 The Market Value of Wind Power; 7.5 Conclusions; References; Part B : Technical Regulations and Grid Code Validation; Chapter 8: Power Quality Standards for Wind Turbines.
Summary: "The second edition of the highly acclaimed Wind Power in Power Systems has been thoroughly revised and expanded to reflect the latest challenges associated with increasing wind power penetration levels. Since its first release, practical experiences with high wind power penetration levels have significantly increased. This book presents an overview of the lessons learned in integrating wind power into power systems and provides an outlook of the relevant issues and solutions to allow even higher wind power penetration levels. This includes the development of standard wind turbine simulation models. This extensive update has 23 brand new chapters in cutting-edge areas including offshore wind farms and storage options, performance validation and certification for grid codes, and the provision of reactive power and voltage control from wind power plants."-- Provided by publisher.
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Text in English.

Cover; Notation; Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Contributors; Abbreviations; Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Preface: Wind Power Myths Debunked; 2.1 Can Grid Operators Deal with the Variability of Wind Power?; 2.2 Does Wind Power Require Back-up Generation?; 2.3 Aren't More CO2 Emissions Generated with Wind Power in Power Systems than Without, Due to Back-up Requirements?; 2.4 Does Wind Power Require Storage?2; 2.5 Isn't the Existing Flexibility Already Fully Utilized?; 2.6 How Often Does the Wind Stop Blowing Everywhere at the Same Time?

2.7 To What Extent can Wind Power Production be Predicted? 2.8 Is it Expensive to Integrate Wind?; 2.9 Doesn't Wind Power Production Require New Transmission, and won't that Make Wind Expensive?10; 2.10 Does Wind Power have Capacity Credit?; 2.11 Don't Wind Power Plants have Low Capacity Factors?; 2.12 Is Wind Power Generation Cost-competitive with Coal or Nuclear?; 2.13 Is there a Limit to How Much Wind Generation Capacity can be Accommodated by the Grid?; 2.14 Summary; Acknowledgment; References; Part A : Theoretical Background.

Chapter 3: Historical Development and Current Status of Wind Power 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Historical Background; 3.3 Current Status of Wind Power Worldwide; 3.4 Status of Wind Turbine Technology; 3.5 Conclusions; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 4: Wind Power in Power Systems: An Introduction; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Power System History; 4.3 Current Status of Wind Power in Power Systems; 4.4 Network Integration Issues for Wind Power; 4.5 Basic Electrical Engineering; 4.6 Characteristics of Wind Power Generation; 4.7 Basic Integration Issues Related to Wind Power; 4.8 Conclusions.

Appendix mechanical Equivalent to Power System Operation with WindPower AA. 1 Introduction; A.2 Active Power Balance; A.3 Synchronous Machines; A.4 Asynchronous Machines; A.5 Power Electronic Interfaces; A.6 Frequency Control; A.7 Wind Power; A.8 Reactive Power Balance; A.9 Asynchronous Machines; A.10 Capacitors; A.11 Synchronous Machines; A.12 Power Electronic Interfaces; References; Chapter 5: Generators and Power Electronics for Wind Turbines; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 State-of-the-Art Technologies; 5.3 Generator Concepts; 5.4 Power Electronic Concepts.

5.5 Power Electronic Solutions in WindFarms 5.6 Conclusions; References; Chapter 6: Power System Impacts of Wind Power; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Operation of the Power System; 6.3 Wind Power Production and the Power System; 6.4 Effects of Wind Energy on the Power System; 6.5 Conclusions; References; Chapter 7: The Value of Wind Power; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 The Value of a Power Plant; 7.3 The Value of Wind Power; 7.4 The Market Value of Wind Power; 7.5 Conclusions; References; Part B : Technical Regulations and Grid Code Validation; Chapter 8: Power Quality Standards for Wind Turbines.

"The second edition of the highly acclaimed Wind Power in Power Systems has been thoroughly revised and expanded to reflect the latest challenges associated with increasing wind power penetration levels. Since its first release, practical experiences with high wind power penetration levels have significantly increased. This book presents an overview of the lessons learned in integrating wind power into power systems and provides an outlook of the relevant issues and solutions to allow even higher wind power penetration levels. This includes the development of standard wind turbine simulation models. This extensive update has 23 brand new chapters in cutting-edge areas including offshore wind farms and storage options, performance validation and certification for grid codes, and the provision of reactive power and voltage control from wind power plants."-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

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