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Ecology and behaviour of the ladybird beetles (coccinellidae).

By: Hodek, Ivo.
Contributor(s): Honěk, A. (Alois) | Van Emden, H. F. (Helmut Fritz) | Wiley InterScience (Online service).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, 2012Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (605 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781118223208; 1118223209.Subject(s): Ladybugs | Zoology | Science | NATURE -- Animals -- Insects & Spiders | SCIENCE -- Life Sciences -- Zoology -- Entomology | LadybugsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ecology and behaviour of the ladybird beetles (coccinellidae).DDC classification: 595.76 | 595.76/9 | 595.769 Online resources: Wiley Online Library
Contents:
Front Matter -- Supplemental Images -- Phylogeny and Classification / Oldrich Nedved, Ivo Kov̀r -- Genetic Studies / John J Sloggett, Alois Honek -- Life History and Development / Oldrich Nedved, Alois Honek -- Distribution and Habitats / Alois Honek -- Food Relationships / Ivo Hodek, Edward W Evans -- Diapause/Dormancy / Ivo Hodek -- Intraguild Interactions / ¡ric Lucas -- Natural Enemies of Ladybird Beetles / Piotr Ceryngier, Helen E Roy, Remy L Poland -- Coccinellids and Semiochemicals / Jan Pettersson -- Quantifying the Impact of Coccinellids on their Prey / J P Michaud, James D Harwood -- Coccinellids in Biological Control / J P Michaud -- Recent Progress and Possible Future Trends in the Study of Coccinellidae / Helmut F van Emden, Ivo Hodek -- Appendix: List of Genera in Tribes and Subfamilies -- Index.
ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR OF THE LADYBIRD BEETLES (COCCINELLIDAE); Contents; DETAILED CONTENTS; Contributors; Preface; Introduction; Taxonomic Glossary; Chapter 1: Phylogeny and Classification; 1.1 POSITION OF THE FAMILY; 1.1.1 The Cerylonid complex; 1.1.2 Sister families; 1.1.3 Feeding habits; 1.1.4 Monophyly of Coccinellidae; 1.2 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FAMILY; 1.3 CHANGES IN THE CLASSIFICATION OF SUBFAMILIES; 1.3.1 Morphologically based classifications; 1.3.2 Split of Sticholotidinae; 1.3.3 Monophyly of other subfamilies; 1.3.3.1 Contribution of immature stages; 1.3.4 Molecular analyses.
1.3.4.1 Alternative molecular methods; 1.3.5 Rejection of the monophyly of subfamilies; 1.4 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SUBFAMILIES AND TRIBES; 1.4.1 Proposed classification; 1.4.2 Microweiseinae; 1.4.3 Sticholotidinae; 1.4.4 Coccinellinae; 1.4.5 Epilachninae; 1.4.6 Exoplectrinae; 1.4.7 Chilocorinae; 1.4.8 Ortaliinae; 1.4.9 Coccidulinae; 1.4.10 Scymninae; 1.5 FUTURE PERSPECTIVES; REFERENCES; Chapter 2: Genetic Studies; 2.1 INTRODUCTION; 2.2 GENOME SIZE; 2.3 CHROMOSOMES AND CYTOLOGY; 2.3.1 Chromosome numbers and banding; 2.3.2 Sex determination; 2.3.3 Supernumerary (B) chromosomes.
2.3.4 Cytogenetic changes, intraspecific cytogenetic variation and speciation; 2.4 COLOUR PATTERN VARIATION; 2.4.1 The nature of colour patterns; 2.4.2 Genetic determination of colour patterns; 2.4.3 Geographic variation; 2.4.4 Temporal variation; 2.4.5 Significance and evolution; 2.5 THE INHERITANCE OF OTHER TRAITS; 2.5.1 Morphological characters: wing polymorphism; 2.5.2 Life history characters: heritability, selection experiments and genetic trade-offs; 2.6 MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDIES; 2.6.1 Sequence evolution; 2.6.1.1 Mitochondrial DNA and the inference of evolutionary history.
2.6.1.2 The ITS1 region; 2.6.2 Molecular studies of coccinellid biology; 2.6.2.1 Species, population and strain identification; 2.6.2.2 Phylogenetics; 2.6.2.3 Population genetic and phylogeographic studies; 2.6.2.4 Reproductive success, paternity and sperm competition; 2.7 CONCLUSIONS; ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND DEDICATION; REFERENCES; Chapter 3: Life History and Development; 3.1 INTRODUCTION; 3.2 EGG; 3.2.1 Egg morphology; 3.2.2 Egg size; 3.2.3 Cluster size; 3.2.4 Hatching rate; 3.2.5 Trophic eggs; 3.3 LARVA; 3.3.1 Larval morphology; 3.3.2 Instars; 3.3.3 Development; 3.3.4 Body size; 3.4 PUPA.
3.4.1 Prepupal stage; 3.4.2 Pupal morphology; 3.4.3 Timing of pupation; 3.4.4 Places of pupation; 3.4.5 Pupal defence; 3.4.6 Colouration and thermal melanism; 3.5 ADULT; 3.5.1 Teneral development; 3.5.2 Wings and f?light; 3.5.3 Pre-oviposition period; 3.5.4 Size; 3.5.5 Ovarioles; 3.5.6 Mating; 3.5.6.1 Frequency and duration of mating; 3.5.6.2 Sperm competition; 3.5.6.3 Female choice and melanism; 3.5.6.4 Hybridization; 3.5.7 Oviposition; 3.5.7.1 Oviposition substrate; 3.5.7.2 Oviposition rhythmicity; 3.5.7.3 Oviposition rate; 3.5.7.4 Oviposition period; 3.5.8 Fecundity; 3.5.9 Longevity; 3.5.9.1 Voltinism.
Summary: Ladybirds are probably the best known predators of aphids and coccids in the world, though this greatly underestimates the diversity of their biology. Maximising their impact on their prey is an important element in modern conservation biological control of indigenous natural enemies in contrast to the classical approach of releasing alien species. Ivo Hodek is one of the most internationally respected experts on coccinellids who has researched these insects for his entire career. He has now brought together 14 scientists of international standing to author 12 chapters, making this book the def.
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Front Matter -- Supplemental Images -- Phylogeny and Classification / Oldrich Nedved, Ivo Kov̀r -- Genetic Studies / John J Sloggett, Alois Honek -- Life History and Development / Oldrich Nedved, Alois Honek -- Distribution and Habitats / Alois Honek -- Food Relationships / Ivo Hodek, Edward W Evans -- Diapause/Dormancy / Ivo Hodek -- Intraguild Interactions / ¡ric Lucas -- Natural Enemies of Ladybird Beetles / Piotr Ceryngier, Helen E Roy, Remy L Poland -- Coccinellids and Semiochemicals / Jan Pettersson -- Quantifying the Impact of Coccinellids on their Prey / J P Michaud, James D Harwood -- Coccinellids in Biological Control / J P Michaud -- Recent Progress and Possible Future Trends in the Study of Coccinellidae / Helmut F van Emden, Ivo Hodek -- Appendix: List of Genera in Tribes and Subfamilies -- Index.

ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOUR OF THE LADYBIRD BEETLES (COCCINELLIDAE); Contents; DETAILED CONTENTS; Contributors; Preface; Introduction; Taxonomic Glossary; Chapter 1: Phylogeny and Classification; 1.1 POSITION OF THE FAMILY; 1.1.1 The Cerylonid complex; 1.1.2 Sister families; 1.1.3 Feeding habits; 1.1.4 Monophyly of Coccinellidae; 1.2 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FAMILY; 1.3 CHANGES IN THE CLASSIFICATION OF SUBFAMILIES; 1.3.1 Morphologically based classifications; 1.3.2 Split of Sticholotidinae; 1.3.3 Monophyly of other subfamilies; 1.3.3.1 Contribution of immature stages; 1.3.4 Molecular analyses.

1.3.4.1 Alternative molecular methods; 1.3.5 Rejection of the monophyly of subfamilies; 1.4 CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SUBFAMILIES AND TRIBES; 1.4.1 Proposed classification; 1.4.2 Microweiseinae; 1.4.3 Sticholotidinae; 1.4.4 Coccinellinae; 1.4.5 Epilachninae; 1.4.6 Exoplectrinae; 1.4.7 Chilocorinae; 1.4.8 Ortaliinae; 1.4.9 Coccidulinae; 1.4.10 Scymninae; 1.5 FUTURE PERSPECTIVES; REFERENCES; Chapter 2: Genetic Studies; 2.1 INTRODUCTION; 2.2 GENOME SIZE; 2.3 CHROMOSOMES AND CYTOLOGY; 2.3.1 Chromosome numbers and banding; 2.3.2 Sex determination; 2.3.3 Supernumerary (B) chromosomes.

2.3.4 Cytogenetic changes, intraspecific cytogenetic variation and speciation; 2.4 COLOUR PATTERN VARIATION; 2.4.1 The nature of colour patterns; 2.4.2 Genetic determination of colour patterns; 2.4.3 Geographic variation; 2.4.4 Temporal variation; 2.4.5 Significance and evolution; 2.5 THE INHERITANCE OF OTHER TRAITS; 2.5.1 Morphological characters: wing polymorphism; 2.5.2 Life history characters: heritability, selection experiments and genetic trade-offs; 2.6 MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDIES; 2.6.1 Sequence evolution; 2.6.1.1 Mitochondrial DNA and the inference of evolutionary history.

2.6.1.2 The ITS1 region; 2.6.2 Molecular studies of coccinellid biology; 2.6.2.1 Species, population and strain identification; 2.6.2.2 Phylogenetics; 2.6.2.3 Population genetic and phylogeographic studies; 2.6.2.4 Reproductive success, paternity and sperm competition; 2.7 CONCLUSIONS; ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND DEDICATION; REFERENCES; Chapter 3: Life History and Development; 3.1 INTRODUCTION; 3.2 EGG; 3.2.1 Egg morphology; 3.2.2 Egg size; 3.2.3 Cluster size; 3.2.4 Hatching rate; 3.2.5 Trophic eggs; 3.3 LARVA; 3.3.1 Larval morphology; 3.3.2 Instars; 3.3.3 Development; 3.3.4 Body size; 3.4 PUPA.

3.4.1 Prepupal stage; 3.4.2 Pupal morphology; 3.4.3 Timing of pupation; 3.4.4 Places of pupation; 3.4.5 Pupal defence; 3.4.6 Colouration and thermal melanism; 3.5 ADULT; 3.5.1 Teneral development; 3.5.2 Wings and f?light; 3.5.3 Pre-oviposition period; 3.5.4 Size; 3.5.5 Ovarioles; 3.5.6 Mating; 3.5.6.1 Frequency and duration of mating; 3.5.6.2 Sperm competition; 3.5.6.3 Female choice and melanism; 3.5.6.4 Hybridization; 3.5.7 Oviposition; 3.5.7.1 Oviposition substrate; 3.5.7.2 Oviposition rhythmicity; 3.5.7.3 Oviposition rate; 3.5.7.4 Oviposition period; 3.5.8 Fecundity; 3.5.9 Longevity; 3.5.9.1 Voltinism.

Ladybirds are probably the best known predators of aphids and coccids in the world, though this greatly underestimates the diversity of their biology. Maximising their impact on their prey is an important element in modern conservation biological control of indigenous natural enemies in contrast to the classical approach of releasing alien species. Ivo Hodek is one of the most internationally respected experts on coccinellids who has researched these insects for his entire career. He has now brought together 14 scientists of international standing to author 12 chapters, making this book the def.

Print version record.

Electronic reproduction. Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley InterScience, 2012. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Web browser. Title from title screen (viewed on May 31, 2012). Access may be restricted to users at subscribing institutions.

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